Residential and long-term care centre (CHSLD)

Visits to CHSLDs that do not have an outbreak are allowed subject to compliance with specific infection prevention and control requirements and depending on the alert level in the territory in question.

To find out the alert level and the requirements in your territory, go to the Map of COVID-19 alert levels by region page.

In CHSLDs that do not have an outbreak and that are at alert level 1 (green) or 2 (yellow), 2 people at a time can visit a resident whether they are visitors or informal caregivers.

In territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange), visits to CHSLDs are not allowed except by informal caregivers (2 people at a time) or for humanitarian reasons.

In territories where the alert level is level 4 (red), visits to CHSLDs are not allowed except by informal caregivers (1 person at a time) or for humanitarian purposes.

If there is an outbreak in a CHSLD, irrespective of where it is located, visits to CHSLDs are not allowed except by informal caregivers (1 person at a time) or for humanitarian purposes.

A person can always say where they would like to go. However, during the pandemic, the facility will prioritize access based on the person’s needs and the availability of places.

If the facility selected is not the one the person wanted to go to, a resident who is in a transitional CHSLD may be transferred to the CHSLD of their choice provided that neither CHSLD has an outbreak (cold CHSLD) and the CHSLDs are located in territories where the alert level is level 1 (green) or 2 (yellow).

Essential items can be delivered to residents. However, in territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange) or 4 (red), items must be left at reception for disinfection of the packaging or container or for quarantine for 72 hours before being given to the resident.

Families who wish to do so may wash residents' clothes only when the alert level in force is level 1 (green) or 2 (yellow). For alert levels 3 (orange) and 4 (red), the resident's clothes must be washed by the CHSLD.

Residents are allowed to leave the CHSLD to go to a medical appointment. Indeed, protecting their health also means maintaining their usual medical follow-ups and consulting when necessary. However, where possible, consultation and treatment with a professional via telehealth (by telephone or videoconference) should be encouraged.

When they return to the CHSLD, the required infection prevention and control measures will be taken.

In CHSLDs that do not have an outbreak, meals can be taken in the dining room and leisure activities can take place while maintaining a distance of 2 metres between people or applying the bubble concept.

In CHSLDs where there are one or more outbreaks, additional measures must be taken on affected units. Group leisure activities and meals in the dining rooms are no longer allowed. Residents eat their meals in their room, but staff will provide them with all the help they need to be able to eat and drink properly. A person will be designated to supervise and attend to the needs of residents who have their meals in their room, for example, if a resident drops a utensil. Individual leisure activities are also available to residents.

In units that do not have an outbreak, meals can be taken in the dining room and group leisure activities can take place while maintaining a distance of 2 metres between people or applying the bubble concept.

In territories where the alert level is level 1 (green) or 2 (yellow), residents can go out with or without supervision depending on the resident's condition.

In territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange) or 4 (red) as well as in the event of preventive isolation or an outbreak, outings are no longer allowed, with the exception of walks taken outside on the CHSLD grounds, which are still allowed under certain conditions. These conditions take the resident’s clinical condition and are communicated by the CHSLD.

Everyone who works in the CHSLD must comply with basic infection prevention and control practices:

  • wash their hands often with soap under warm running water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand rub;
  • cover their mouth and nose with their arm to reduce the spread of germs if they cough or sneeze;
  • use a tissue to blow their nose, dispose of it as soon as possible and wash their hands afterwards;
  • avoid direct contact when they greet someone, such as shaking hands.

In addition, staff use personal protective equipment as recommended by the facility’s infection prevention and control teams and by the Institut national de santé publique du Québec. Furthermore, it is recommended that staff mobility be reconsidered in order to limit the possibility of an employee working in different facilities and becoming a vector of transmission.

If a resident has symptoms of COVID-19, they must be separated from other residents and tested immediately. Infection prevention and control measures are increased. The resident’s health is monitored constantly by the healthcare team.

In territories where the alert level is level 1 (green) or 2 (yellow), a mobile hairdresser who works in different facilities can provide their services to residents in CHSLDs. This practice is not allowed in territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange) or 4 (red).

In territories where the alert level is level 1 (green), 2 (yellow) or 3 (orange), hairdressing services with a dedicated room are allowed in CHLSDs that do not have an outbreak. When the alert level is level 4 (red) or in CHSLDs where there is an outbreak, hairdressing services are prohibited.

An informal caregiver can provide support to someone who lives in a CHSLD provided they comply with certain conditions.

Caregivers will have to comply with certain measures. In particular, they must:

  • Wear a procedure mask at all times;
  • Practice strict hand hygiene;
  • Monitor themselves closely for symptoms;
  • The caregiver may be asked to use additional personal protective equipment depending on the resident’s condition.

You can also read and print out the Information sheet for informal and family caregivers whose loved one is institutionalized - Coronavirus (COVID-19) This hyperlink will open in a new window.. It describes the infection prevention and protective measures that you will have to follow and links that you might find very helpful.

A gift can be delivered to a resident in a CHSLD. However, there may be some conditions, depending on the CHSLD, check with it before having a gift delivered.

Homemade meals may be delivered. However, the container must be able to be disinfected before being transmitted to the resident.

Flower deliveries are allowed. Flowers, like all other gifts, must be wrapped and left at the entrance.

However, in territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange) or 4 (red), items must be left at reception for disinfection of the packaging or container or for quarantine for 72 hours before being given to the resident.

Hospital centres

Yes, throughout their time in various living or health care facilities, including hospital, a person at the end of life may have an informal caregiver present, subject to certain conditions, in particular they must not have symptoms consistent with COVID‑19. In these exceptional situations, allowances may be made on a case-by-case basis by the institution.

Yes, in accordance with the conditions listed on the Guidelines for visitors to hospitals page.

Pregnancy and perinatal services

At present, pregnant women can be accompanied by a loved one when giving birth in Québec hospitals. However, hospitals may adopt certain specific measures. To obtain additional information in this regard, pregnant women can contact their hospital, consult the Guidelines for visitors to hospital centres during COVID-19 page.

Family doctors and specialists

Regardless of why you need a medical consultation, if you have flu-like symptoms, gastroenteritis or symptoms of COVID‑19, evaluate the symptoms on Québec.ca/decisioncovid19 or call 1-877-644-4545 right away and comply with the directives that you are given.

If you do not have flu-like symptoms, gastroenteritis or symptoms of COVID‑19, you can always consult if you need to by, contacting your family doctor, medical clinic or family medicine group (FMG) to make an appointment for a consultation over the telephone or in person. If you are unable to reach your medical clinic or are not registered with a family doctor, you can call Info‑Santé 811 to speak to a nurse, get advice about what to do and be referred, if necessary, to the appropriate resource.

People who have a chronic disease (e.g., diabetes, cardiovascular disease, hypertension, degenerative disease, etc.), cancer or any other disease or condition that requires regular health follow-up are, in particular, encouraged to have these follow-ups and go to their medical appointments.

Yes, the RAMQ will from now on cover health services provided by correspondence or by means of telecommunications. This coverage includes, for example, a telephone consultation with a physician.

Caregivers

Due to the pandemic, many informal caregivers find that their everyday life has been disrupted. You may be wondering what the best way to support your loved one is. You have to solve practical problems, provide moral support, perhaps help them out financially too.

Please read the Public Health Recommendations for Informal Caregivers This hyperlink will open in a new window. brochure. It provides information about how you can:

  • take care of yourself;
  • create a support network that is adapted to the situation so that you can maintain your health and quality of life;
  • stay connected with your loved ones despite physical distancing measures and visitor restrictions in some facilities;
  • make the best possible decisions for your health and your loved ones’ health during the coronavirus disease (COVID‑19) pandemic;
  • get referred to appropriate resources for your situation.

In addition, caregiver Support Helpline counsellors are there to listen to you, answer your questions and, if necessary, refer you to programs and resources that can help you in your everyday life. Do not hesitate to call them at 1‑855‑852‑7784 or to visit the Caregiver Support This hyperlink will open in a new window. website.

You are allowed to accompany someone who is blind or visually impaired. To keep safe, you must follow the health recommendations for everyone and, if you cannot maintain a physical distance of 2 metres, wearing a mask is strongly recommended.

To prepare yourself properly for your first visit, we suggest your read the webpage Informal and family caregivers during the coronavirus disease (COVID‑19) pandemic which was created to assist you.

It contains information and video clips that will be useful for:

  • preparing for your first visit, since it is highly likely that the facility you visited before the COVID‑19 pandemic has changed significantly;
  • checking if you meet the criteria for determining that an informal caregiver is authorized to provide support in a facility;
  • letting you know what is involved and what risks are associated with going into your loved one’s facility so that you can make a voluntary and informed decision;
  • learning about the safety guidelines and hygiene and protective measures you will have to follow;
  • practical advice that will make your visit more enjoyable, such as eating and drinking well before you visit your loved one, since it might be difficult to do so once you have put the protective equipment on;
  • advice that you can read and, if necessary, follow to protect your psychological health and continue distance socializing with your loved one;
  • learning how to deal with grief during the pandemic if you have had the misfortune to lose a loved one.

You can also read and print out the Information sheet for informal and family caregivers whose loved one is institutionalized This hyperlink will open in a new window.. It describes the infection prevention and protective measures that you will have to follow and links that you might find very helpful.

No. If someone in your home has symptoms or is self-isolating, you cannot visit your loved one even if you do not have symptoms of COVID‑19. It is important to follow this instruction to keep everyone safe. During the COVID‑19 pandemic, there might be very serious consequences for the residents, including your loved one.

Private seniors’ residences (RPA)

Visits to RPA where there is no outbreak are allowed subject to compliance with specific infection prevention and control conditions.

All visitors 2 years of age and older must wear a mask or face covering when moving about in the home.

Visitors must provide their contact information in an entry and exit management register so that they can be contacted promptly by a public health authority in the event of an outbreak. Visitors who refuse to provide this information will not be able to enter in the private seniors’ home.

During visits, the maximum number of people allowed at a private gathering must be observed. This number varies depending on the alert level in your territory. For more information, go to the page Gatherings and audiences during the COVID-19 pandemic.

In territories where the alert level is level 4 (red), only visits by an informal caregiver or humanitarian visits to a resident in palliative care at the end of life are allowed.

Food may be delivered to RPAs. However, in territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange) or 4 (red), items must be left at reception for disinfection of the packaging or container or for quarantine for 72 hours before being given to the resident. 

Items required by users may be delivered. However, in territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange) or 4 (red), items must be left at reception for disinfection of the packaging or container or for quarantine for 72 hours before being given to the resident.

Residents can leave their RPA to go to a medical appointment. Indeed, protecting their health also means maintaining their usual medical follow-ups and consulting when necessary. However, where possible, consultation and treatment with a professional via telehealth (by telephone or videoconference) should be encouraged.

When they return to the RPA, all infection prevention and control measures must be rigorously applied. For example, you must:

  • wear your mask or face covering in common areas;
  • wash your hands often with soap under warm running water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand rub;
  • cover your mouth and nose with your arm to reduce the spread of germs if you cough or sneeze. If you use a tissue, dispose of it as soon as possible and wash your hands afterwards;
  • keep a distance of 2 metres from other people and avoid direct contact when you greet someone, such as shaking hands.

Residents of RPAs where there is no outbreak can take a walk outside unsupervised. They must wear a mask or face covering in the common areas of the RPA.

However, in territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange) or 4 (red), it is strongly recommended that outings be limited as much as possible by encouraging online shopping and the use of home delivery services (shopping, pharmacy, etc.).

In RPAs where there is an outbreak or that are in preventive isolation, outings in the community are not allowed. However, in the event of a partial outbreak, walks outside may be allowed with authorization from the infection prevention and control team.

When they return to the RPA, all infection prevention and control measures must be rigorously applied. For example, you must:

  • wear your mask or face covering in common areas;
  • wash your hands often with soap under warm running water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand rub;
  • cover your mouth and nose with your arm to reduce the spread of germs if you cough or sneeze. If you use a tissue, dispose of it as soon as possible and wash your hands afterwards;
  • keep a distance of 2 metres from other people and avoid direct contact when you greet someone, such as shaking hands.

In territories where the alert level is level 1 (green) or 2 (yellow), you can move a loved one out of their RPA out and care for them in your own home.

However, it is recommended that infection prevention and control measures be put in place to minimize the risk of contamination in your home. You should follow these instructions:

  • All members of the household must wash their hands frequently.
  • As much as possible, a distance of 2 metres must be maintained between people in the home.
  • Do not have other visitors to the home.
  • The person you are caring for must not go out to visit other family members or to go to a public place (for example, grocery store, pharmacy, bank, etc.).
  • If the person you are caring for has to go out for health care, they must have an appointment. They should avoid using public transit and should maintain a distance of 2 metres from other people, as much as possible.
  • Other members of the household must only go out when necessary, wear a face covering or mask in public places and must follow strict hand hygiene measures before, during and after doing so.
  • High-touch items and surfaces, such as door handles, faucets, switches and stair rails should be cleaned and disinfected often.

If any of the following situations apply to your loved one who lives in a RPA or to a member of your household, you will not, temporarily, be able to have your loved one stay with you:

  • The person who lives in the RPA or one of the people in the household where they would be staying has one or more symptoms of COVID‑19 (unusual cough, fever, difficulty breathing, sudden loss of sense of smell without a stuffy nose, with or without loss of sense of taste);
  • The person who lives in the RPA or one of the people in the household where they would be staying has specifically been told to self-isolate by public health because they:
    • have had close contact (high or moderate risk exposure) with a confirmed case of COVID‑19;
    • are waiting for a COVID‑19 test result.

In these situations, you will have to wait until the person is allowed to end their self-isolation before making arrangements to move your loved one out of the RPA.

When they return to their RPA, all infection prevention and control measures must be rigorously applied. For example, you must:

  • wear your mask or face covering in common areas;
  • wash your hands often with soap under warm running water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand rub;
  • cover your mouth and nose with your arm to reduce the spread of germs if you cough or sneeze. If you use a tissue, dispose of it as soon as possible and wash your hands afterwards;
  • keep a distance of 2 metres from other people and avoid direct contact when you greet someone, such as shaking hands.

In a territory where the alert level is level 3 (orange), it is recommended that outings be limited.

In a territory where the alert level is level 4 (red), it is recommended that the frequency be limited to essential outings. In addition, interregional travel is strongly discouraged.

You can move a loved one out of a RPA where cases of COVID‑19 have been reported out and care for them in your own home for an extended period.

However, it is recommended that infection prevention and control measures be put in place to minimize the risk of contamination in your home. You should follow these instructions:

  • All members of the household must wash their hands frequently.
  • As much as possible, a distance of 2 metres must be maintained between people in the home.
  • Do not have visitors to the home.
  • The person you are caring for must not go out to visit other family members.
  • If the person you are caring for has to go out for health care, they must have an appointment. They should avoid using public transit and should maintain a distance of 2 metres from other people, as much as possible;
  • Other members of the household must only go out when necessary and must follow strict hand hygiene measures before, during and after doing so;
  • High-touch items and surfaces, such as door handles, faucets, switches and stair rails should be cleaned and disinfected often.

If any of the following situations apply to your loved one who lives in a RPA or to a member of your household, you will not, temporarily, be able to have your loved one stay with you:

  • The person who lives in the RPA or one of the people in the household where they would be staying has one or more symptoms of COVID‑19 (unusual cough, fever, difficulty breathing, sudden loss of sense of smell without a stuffy nose, with or without loss of sense of taste);
  • The person who lives in the RPA or one of the people in the household where they would be staying has specifically been told to self-isolate by public health because they:
    • have had close contact (high or moderate risk exposure) with a confirmed case of COVID‑19;
    • are waiting for a COVID‑19 test result.

In these situations, you will have to wait until the person is allowed to end their self-isolation before making arrangements to move your loved one out of the RPA.

When they return to their RPA, all infection prevention and control measures must be rigorously applied. For example, you must:

  • wear your mask or face covering in common areas;
  • wash your hands often with soap under warm running water for at least 20 seconds or use an alcohol-based hand rub;
  • cover your mouth and nose with your arm to reduce the spread of germs if you cough or sneeze. If you use a tissue, dispose of it as soon as possible and wash your hands afterwards;
  • keep a distance of 2 metres from other people and avoid direct contact when you greet someone, such as shaking hands.

Visits to rental units in RPAs are allowed provided the infection protection and control measures for territories at alert level 1 (green) and 2 (yellow) are observed. However, when the territory is at alert level 3 (orange), virtual visits should be encouraged and the frequency of in-person visits limited.

Visits are not recommended at alert level 4 (red). However, if visits must take place, only the future resident and an informal caregiver may be present. The RPA must also implement all the infection prevention and control measures.

If there is an outbreak in the RPA, visits with a view to moving in must be suspended, except for emergencies.

A gift can be delivered to a resident in a RPA. However, there may be some exceptions depending on the RPA, check with it before having a gift delivered.

Home-cooked meals are accepted. However, the container must be able to be disinfected before being transmitted to the resident.

Flower delivery can be accepted. Flowers, like all other gifts, must be placed at the entrance, wrapped.

However, in territories where the alert level is level 3 (orange) or 4 (red), items must be deposited at reception for disinfection of the packaging or container or for quarantine for 72 hours before being given to the resident.

An informal caregiver can provide support to someone who lives in RPA provided they comply with certain conditions. They must, in particular:

  • Wear a procedure mask at all times;
  • Practice strict hand hygiene;
  • Monitor themselves closely for symptoms;
  • The caregiver may be asked to use additional personal protective equipment depending on the resident’s condition.

You can also read and print out the Information sheet for informal and family caregivers whose loved one is institutionalized - Coronavirus (COVID‑19) This hyperlink will open in a new window.. It describes the infection prevention and protective measures that you will have to follow and links that you might find very helpful.

Yes, but movers are required to follow procedures in relation to COVID‑19.

No, moving is allowed. The following preventive measures must be taken:

  • The health recommendations for everyone must be followed at all times by everyone involved in the move.
  • Movers or family and friends who are helping with the move must not have symptoms of COVID-19 and self-isolating instructions must be followed as needed.
  • The number of movers or family members and friends helping with the move must be kept to a minimum.
  • Movers, family and friends and the resident are not allowed to move around the residence unless it is required for the move. In this case, one or two representatives of the resident may accompany them in the residence.
  • When the movers have finished, as few family members or friends as possible may enter the unit to set up the essentials for the resident and to ensure that the space is safe. Light work can be done, in particular cleaning and painting.
  • Surfaces that may have been touched by the movers must be cleaned with the usual disinfectant products.
  • Residents must avoid going near areas where the movers went.

However, a new resident with suspected or confirmed COVID-19 are still not allowed to be admitted to a RPA that does not already have COVID-19 cases.